About

Our Mission Statement

NATCA is a membership-owned organization. We advance the status, professionalism and working conditions of Air Traffic Controllers through bargaining, political action and lawful concerted action. A90 NATCA is a proud member of Natca New England. Our members are engaged locally, regionally and nationally.

About Our Facility

A90 is currently made up of three areas:

Manchester Area (Boston North)

On the left side of the room when you walk into the Operations room is the Manchester Area. The position layout for these sectors from left to right is:
Low Sector (SO)
East Coordinator (CE) This position has the capability to Monitor any position/frequency.
East Sector (SE)
Manchester Flight Data (FD-M)
Fitzy Sector (SF)
West Sector (SW)
Manchester Coordinator (CM). This position also has the capability to monitor any position/frequency.
Tommy Sector (ST)

Tommy – ST – 127.350 MHz; 385.450 MHz

The Tommy sector is one of two Low sectors that overlies the Manchester Airport. This sector owns that airspace from the Manchester Airport to about 25 miles (40 km) north of Manchester from above the surface to and including 4,000 feet (1,200 m). The Tommy sector is either a Final or an Initial Departure sector for the Manchester airport, depending on runway configuration. Tommy is usually combined at Fitzy.

Fitzy – SF – 124.900 MHz; 385.450 MHz

The Fitzy sector is one of two Low sectors that overlies the Manchester Airport. This sector owns that airspace from the Manchester Airport to about 15 miles (24 km) south of Manchester from above the surface to and including 4,000 feet (1,200 m). The Fitzy sector is either a Final or an Initial Departure sector for the Manchester airport, depending on runway configuration. This sector also handles departures coming out of Nashua and arrivals going to Nashua.
East – SE – 125.050 MHz; 269.400 MHz
The East sector overlies the Low sector from above 4000 to and including 10,000. This sector sequences and descends BOS Area arrivals via ENE and hands off to the Rockport sector. This sector also climbs and descends arrivals and departures at Manchester, Pease, and satellites.

Low – SO – 125.8250 MHz; 353.500 MHz

The Low sector overlies the Pease Airport from above the surface to and including 4,000 feet (1,200 m). This sector owns from about 25 miles (40 km) north of Pease to about 25 miles (40 km) south of Pease and from 15 miles (24 km) east to 15 miles (24 km) west of Pease. This sector is primarily responsible for arrivals and departures at Pease Airport. Low is always combined at East and is only opened for training purposes.

West – SW – 134.750 MHz; 254.250 MHz

The West sector overlies both Tommy and Fitzy sectors from above 4000 to and including 10,000. It also owns from above the surface to and including 10,000 in the vicinity of Laconia Municipal Airport (LCI). This sector is primarily responsible for descending arrivals into Manchester and handing off to either Tommy or Fitzy as appropriate. This sector also climbs westbound departures from either Tommy or Fitzy and hands off to Boston Center.
Laconia – 119.850 MHz
This frequency is used to provide IFR clearances and cancellations to aircraft on the ground at Laconia Municipal Airport (LCI).
Concord – 133.650 MHz
This frequency is used to provide IFR clearances and cancellations to aircraft on the ground at Concord Municipal Airport (CON).
Nashua – 121.800 MHz
When Nashua Tower (ASH) is closed (between 9 PM and 7 AM), The Nashua Ground Control frequency is switched over the Manchester Area controller. Pilots can use this frequency for clearance delivery and IFR cancellations when on the ground at Nashua.
Each Airport Air Traffic Control Tower in the Manchester area (Nashua and Pease) have STARS Tower Display workstations displays that are linked to the A90 STARS automation system.
All of the MHT positions have the ability to receive and transmit on 121.500 MHz and 243.000 MHz and is monitored by the Flight Data position.

Boston Legacy Area

Lincoln – SL – 127.200 MHz

The Lincoln sector is primarily a West Departure sector. All departures heading westbound are handed off from Initial Departure to this sector, where they are sequenced, climbed to 14,000 feet (4,300 m), and handed off to Boston Center (BOSOX 47 sector 133.420/307.900). Lincoln also handles prop arrivals to Boston Logan over WOONS, descends them, and hands off to Final 1 or 2. Lincoln is always combined at Initial Departure, and is only opened for training purposes.

Final 1 – F1 – 126.500 MHz

The primary Final sector for arrivals to Boston Logan. Most arrivals will talk to this controller before being transferred to Boston Tower. Final 1 generally owns airspace up to 6,000 feet (1,800 m) within about 8 miles (13 km) either side of the final approach course in use. Depending on the runways in use, this sector may or may not be combined with Final 2.

Final 2 – F2 – 119.650 MHz

The secondary Final sector for arrivals to Boston Logan. This sector is only functional in certain runway configurations. Final 2 is most often used for arrivals to 22L and 4L. Final 2 generally owns airspace up to 5,000 feet (1,500 m) within about 7 miles (11 km) either side of the final approach course in use. At most other times, Final 2 is combined at Final 1.

Initial Departure – ID – 133.000 MHz

All departures from Boston Logan will initially talk to this sector. Initial Departure issues an initial climb and turn to a departure, then hands off to either the Rockport, Plymouth, or Lincoln sector for the sequence to their first fix. The altitudes owned by Initial Departure vary based on configuration. During the Mid-shift all the sectors are combined at initial departure ID).

Plymouth – SM – 120.600 MHz

The Plymouth sector is primarily an arrival sector for Boston Logan arrivals over PVD, as well as a departure sector for all departures heading south. Boston Logan arrivals are handed off from Boston Center (PVD 34 sector 124.85/269.200), descended and sequenced, and handed off to Final 1 or 2, depending on the assigned runway. The Plymouth sector generally owns from above Final or Satellite airspace up to 14,000 feet (4,300 m).

Rockport – SR – 118.250 MHz

The Rockport sector is primarily an arrival sector for Boston Logan arrivals over GDM and SCUPP, as well as a departure sector for all departures heading north. Boston Logan arrivals are handed off from Boston Center (GDM 36 sector 123.750/338.200/PARSO 16 sector 128.200/263.050), descended and sequenced, and handed off to Final 1 or 2, depending on the assigned runway. The Rockport sector generally owns from above Final or Satellite airspace up to 14,000 feet (4,300 m).

Lynch – AL – 124.100 MHz

The Lynch sector is primarily a satellite sector for all airports south of Boston. The Lynch sector owns from the surface to between 2000 and 4,000 feet (1,200 m), depending on the distance from Boston Logan airport. Lynch primarily provides services to aircraft landing and departing Norwood Memorial. Depending on traffic Lynch Sector (AL) is usually combined with the Plymouth Sector (SM).

Bedford – SB – 124.400 MHz

The Bedford sector is primarily a satellite sector for all airports north of Boston. The Bedford sector owns from the surface to between 2000 and 5,000 feet (1,500 m), depending on the distance from Boston Logan airport. Bedford primarily provides services to aircraft landing and departing Hanscom Field, Beverly Municipal, and Lawrence Municipal.
Each Boston position has the ability to receive and transmit on 121.500 MHz and 243.000 MHz and is monitored by the Bedford Sector (SB).

Boston South (Cape Area)

The ASR-8 Radar and ASR-9 systems have 6 sectors of airspace:
These sectors are combined and de-combined as traffic and staffing permit.

OTIS ARRIVAL (O scope) 126.3 MHz

This sector is responsible for traffic over the Cape Cod peninsula and Plymouth areas at and below 3,000 feet. Arrivals and departures from FMH, HYA, PYM, CQX, PVC, 5B6, and 1B2 airports.

CAPE NORTH ARRIVAL (N scope) 118.2 MHz

This sector is responsible for traffic over the Cape Cod peninsula and Plymouth areas at above 4,000 feet. It has sequence setting authority for ACK arrivals via the Marconi VOR (LFV).

CAPE SOUTH ARRIVAL (S scope) 133.75 MHz

Responsible for the separation of traffic in the vicinity of Martha’s Vineyard island 050-100. This sector sequences IFR traffic into Nantucket Airport from the west and has sequence setting authority for Cape and Island departures westbound via Providence VOR.

MARTHA’S VINEYARD ARRIVAL (Y scope) 119.7

Responsible for Martha’s Vineyard Airport arrivals and departures. This controller sequences and vectors IFR arrivals to the active runway and will radar identify, climb, and turn on course IFR departures from MVY. This sector also handles any IFR traffic into or out of the Katama Airpark.
South Side Radar System:
The ASR-9 Radar and ARTS systems have 2 sectors of airspace:

These sectors are combined and de-combined as traffic and staffing permit.

NANTUCKET DEPARTURE (K scope) 118.85 MHz

This sector is responsible for separating departing IFR traffic from ACK. This sector will also sequence IFR arrivals coming in from the opposite side of the airport from the final approach in use (example: traffic from the west when runway 24 in use) and hand them off to the Nantucket Arrival controller.
Other Operational Positions:

NANTUCKET ARRIVAL (A scope) 126.1 MHz

Just as the name suggests, this sector sequences arriving IFR aircraft to the active runway at Nantucket Airport (ACK).
Cape TRACON also operates 2 Flight Data positions:

Flight Data 1 (FD1): Duties include reading IFR clearances to pilots on the ground at K90’s satellite airports, obtaining release times for airport under Traffic Management Initiatives, obtaining IFR releases from radar controllers, relaying IFR cancellations to radar controller, disseminating Traffic Management messages/hazardous weather information, as well as other various duties.
Flight Data 2 (FD2): Assists FD1 as needed. (Only staffed during high demand traffic).

The Operations Room

The Operations Room of the Boston Consolidated TRACON.
General
Located on the second floor of the facility. Below the operations control room on the first floor is the electronics room where all of the computer and other electronic equipment is housed, with extra space for expansion or testing of new equipment. The Facility is backed up by two 1250 kW diesel generators and 4 UPS units (two 225kVA, two 40kVA).

Wall displays

A90 is equipped with multiple plasma flat-screen television screens which are used to display up to 16 different types of information needed by supervisory, traffic management and controllers-in-charge ranging from ETMS to Weather. Although they can be set to display almost anything, they will usually be set to one of three things. Commonly, a map of the Northeast United States will be displayed that shows all traffic landing or departing at Boston or Boston Satellite fields. This allows the controllers to look up at the screen and quickly tell if there is a rush about to come. Also commonly displayed is the IDS5 display. This information is also shown on a small touch-screen above each controller’s station. Also, commonly displayed above the Initial Departure sector is a live video feed from Boston Tower showing the departure strip bay. This camera system is used to satisfy the requirement for “non-verbal rolling notification”[citation needed] as required by FAAO 7110.65. What is displayed on each screen can be changed at one of the center console positions, which is controlled with a computer touch screen.

Training

A90 has a state-of-the-art simulator training facility located on the second floor adjacent to the operations control room. The room contains five training positions. The training room includes a Raytheon Standard Terminal Automation Replacement System (STARS). The STARS system has an embedded simulator ATCoach which is produced by UFA. Inc. out of Woburn, Massachusetts. This system provides the instructor and the student with a virtual display of live traffic on the STARS Terminal Controller workstation TCW. Raytheon provides the hardware and UFA provides the software and embedded simulator. Features of this simulator include Weather – Pre-programmed events – 600 aircraft profiles – Up to 24 simultaneous training exercises – Scenario development tools – Pseudo Pilot functions. This is one of the most advanced simulators in the National Airspace System.

Above each TDW is an exact replica of the IDS-5 information display.

The facility also has State-of-the-art classrooms which are able to feature computer-generated graphics and multimedia source material that comes right from the Operations room.

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